Book Review: Teeth

Two fish hooks arranged in the shape of a heart, against a background of silver fish scales.

Cover image for Hannah Moskowitz’s novel, Teeth.

Rudy’s life is flipped upside-down when his family moves to a remote island in a last attempt to save his sick younger brother…Then he meets Diana, who makes him wonder what he even knows about love, and Teeth, who makes him question what he knows about anything…He soon learns that Teeth has terrible secrets. Violent secrets. Secrets that will force Rudy to choose between his own happiness and his brother’s life. (Source: Goodreads)

TEETH is the second book by Hannah Moskowitz I have read this year, the first being the utterly superb NOT OTHERWISE SPECIFIED, and in a way, they have similar narratives of a main protagonist who feels isolated and alone who connects to another person through their shared struggles; with NOW, it’s Etta and Bianca’s eating disorders and drive to be successful in theater, while in TEETH, it is Teeth and Rudy’s loneliness and identity crises. Rudy struggles with living in a family with a sick brother and no longer having a life outside of taking care of him; Teeth struggles with his very sense of who he is, a scarred and patchy fish boy with a horrifying origin.

TEETH also reminds me a lot of Aaron Stormer’s SPONTANEOUS, which I’ve reviewed here, as a text that it took me a good chunk of time to get into, but once I got into it, man, I got into it, and nothing else mattered. The more time you spend with Rudy and Teeth and the other island inhabitants, you more you get to care about what they are going through. Everyone on this island is unwell, but not everyone is actively dying from it.

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